Journal of Gastronomy 3(2) Abstracts

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Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 81-92
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15281329212207
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Problematizing the Ethical “Taste” of Authenticity

Giovanna Bertella

School of Business and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway

Ethical vegetarianism is a relatively new phenomenon spreading in several Western countries. The aim of this study is to discuss the use of animal-derived food in tourism, and in particular in tourism promotion, with reference to the concept of authenticity, seeing it into the perspective of ethical vegetarians and considering the animal ethics positions of ecofeminism and critical animal studies. The aspects discussed are illustrated by several examples and summarized in a graphic model and a set of questions. The model can help both scholars and practitioners to better understand the new and growing market segment of ethical vegetarians. Moreover, the questions raised in this study may contribute to a deeper reflection on the ethical implications of animal-derived food in tourism and how its promotion may affect values such as empathy, respect, and responsibility towards animals.

Key words: Food tourism; Food promotion; Authenticity; Vegetarianism/veganism; Animal ethics

Address correspondence to Giovanna Bertella, School of Business and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, NO-9037 Tromsø, Norway. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 93-105
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15281329212216
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Spiritourism and Brand Identity Building: The Case of Printemps des Liqueurs

Cornelia Caseau

University of Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Burgundy School of Business-CEREN (EA 7477). Dijon Cedex-France

Spiritourism is a relatively recent trend in France that refers to tourist-based activities designed to promote regions where spirits are produced. In order to invite spiritourists to experience different companies and their various spirits, the French Liqueurs Trade Union initiated a collective brand identity campaign, the Printemps des Liqueurs (the Spring of Liqueurs project) in 2005, which has since become one of spiritourism’s key events. The aim of this article, based on qualitative research and the study of written documents and websites, is to present and analyze the particularities of this campaign during which tourists learn about different regions and firms across France, taste the products, and participate in multisensory and memorable experiences. This kind of marketing creates a relationship between professionals and amateurs, and both the brand image of the Printemps des Liqueurs and the development of spiritourism is enhanced when visitors identify with the firms and the industrial patrimony of the region.

Key words: Flavors; Industrial patrimony; Know-how; Liqueurs; Spirits; Spiritourism

Address correspondence to Cornelia Caseau, Associate Professor, Researcher, University of Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Burgundy School of Business-CEREN (EA 7477), 29, rue Sambin, BP 50608, 21006 Dijon Cedex-France. Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 107-121
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15281329212225
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Rise of Whiskey Tourism in Ireland: Developing a Terroir Engagement Template

Brian Murphy and Raymond Keaney

Department of Management, Institute of Technology Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland

The recently launched Irish Whiskey Tourism Strategy proposes that Ireland will become the world leader in whiskey tourism by the year 2030. This target stems from the fact that Irish Whiskey has been recently cited as being the fastest growing subsection of the entire whiskey category globally. Concepts like authenticity, place, story, and indeed terroir are frequently deployed when considering many aspects of contemporary whiskey tourism sites but interpretation and analysis of such nebulous concepts can vary considerably and they can prove very difficult to define. In particular, the concept of terroir has proved quite challenging, not only in terms of definition, but also in terms of how one communicates a sense of terroir to a tourist audience. And yet a clear understanding is very necessary when developing appropriate marketing strategies. This research explores definitions of the terroir concept with a view to providing insights into how contemporary drink tourism sites might successfully engage with visitors through a variety of mediums in an effort to convey that true sense of terroir. It introduces the Fourth Space model, which draws on the long-lived success of the French wine sectors’ portrayal of terroir to consumers. It provides a framework to help explore how beverage tourism sites can both analyze and communicate terroir elements to visitors. Using a comparative analysis of two whiskey tourism sites in Dublin, Ireland the study maps their level of terroir engagement across a number of different strands according to the Fourth Space model. The analysis provides initial evidence of the potential benefits of such a model in developing strategies that will be of benefit to whiskey tourism sites; it shows how they can enhance their ability to convey a strong and authentic sense of terroir, thus allowing them to compete in an increasingly competitive beverage tourism market.

Key words: Tourism; Fourth Space; Terroir; Whiskey; Wine; Marketing

Address correspondence to Brian Murphy, Department of Management, Institute of Technology TallaghtTallaght, Dublin 24, D24 FKT9, Ireland. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 123-129
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15281329212234
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Hotel Food and Beverage Services: Cannibalistic or Complimentary

D. Christopher Taylor,* Jason Draper,* and Rhonda Hammond†

*Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA
†College of Business, Hospitality Business, Washington State University, Tri-Cities, Pullman, WA, USA

As there is a gap in the research in evaluating the relationship of hotel room sales with food and beverage (F&B) sales, this study focused on the differences in yearly sales of rooms and F&B revenue in hotels from 2011 to 2013. This study also focuses on the relationships between various hotel measurements (e.g., number of rooms, occupancy, average daily rate) and food and beverage sales in hotels. Ultimately, it addresses trends associated with hotel F&B and traveler demands that would potentially impact revenue. Finally, the study suggests that the relationship between food sales and beverage sales at hotel bars may be that the food typically sold in bars would be geared to increasing thirst. Ultimately, this study identified differences in yearly sales of rooms and food and beverages revenue in hotels. It also revealed relationships between various hotel measurements and identified if certain F&B services might hinder or cannibalize sales in other areas of food and beverage, which the findings suggest it does.

Key words: Beverages sales; Hotel revenue; Food and beverage

Address correspondence to D. Christopher Taylor, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, University of Houston, 229 C.N. Hilton Hotel and College, Houston, TX 77204-3028, USA. Tel: 713-743-0952; Fax: 713-743-3696; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 131-146
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15281329212243
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Gastronomy Tourism: An Interdisciplinary Literature Review of Research Areas, Disciplines, and Dynamics

Anna De Jong,* Monica Palladino,† Roma Garrido Puig,‡ Giuseppa Romeo,† Nadia Fava,‡ Carlo Cafiero,§ Wilhelm Skoglund,¶ Peter Varley,** Claudio Marciano,† Daniel Laven,†† and Annelie Sjolander-Lindqvist‡‡

*School of Hospitality and Tourism Management, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK
Agraria Department, Mediterranea University of Reggio Calabria, Reggio Calabria, Italy
‡EPS, University of Girona, Girona, Spain
§Statistics Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy
¶Department of Business, Economics and Law, Mid Sweden University, Ostersund, Sweden
**Western Norway Research Institute, Sogndal, Norway
††Department of Tourism Studies and Geography/European Tourism Research Institute (ETOUR), Mid Sweden University, Ostersund, Sweden
‡‡Gothenburg Research Institute, University of Gothenburg, Goteborg, Sweden

Residing with the exponential growth of gastronomy tourism research, a number of review articles have examined the relationship of gastronomy and tourism from distinct thematic and disciplinary perspectives. What remains absent is a comprehensive overview that encapsulates the interdisciplinary dimensions of this area of research. In response, this study comprehensively investigates gastronomy tourism literature utilizing a network and content analysis, with an aim to map the main subject areas concerned with gastronomy tourism and relations between varying subject areas. In doing so, themes determining gastronomy tourism and focus for future exploration are identified. The review findings suggest that the trajectory of gastronomy tourism research is characterized by the dominance of “tourism, leisure, and hospitality management” and “geography, planning, and development.” Three recommendations are proposed to assist development of gastronomy tourism research: increased dialogue across subject areas, development of critical and theoretical approaches, and greater engagement with sustainability debates.

Key words: Literature review; Interdisciplinary research; Research areas; Content analysis, Network analysis; Sustainability

Address correspondence to Anna de Jong, School of Hospitality and Tourism Management, University of Surrey, Stag Hill, Guildford, GU2 7XH, UK. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 147-161
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15308029980109
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Picture it: The Use of Food-Related Images in Tourism Visitor’s Guides

Susan C. Graham, Elizabeth Toombs, Shannon A. Courtney, and Hannah Dawson

Faculty of Business, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada

Culinary tourism has become an important means of attracting quality visitors for many destinations. As tourism destination marketers develop the brands and associated promotional material through which to communicate with potential visitors, the need to identify ways to differentiation their place brand vis-à-vis the place brand of other tourism destinations becomes paramount. One way to engage potential visitors via tourism promotional material is through the use of images. By examining the food-related imagery used by specific Canadian tourism destinations, the increased focus on culinary tourism and the evolution of the use of imagery can be seen more clearly. This study offers a contribution to tourism research by examining the evolution of culinary tourism promotion in three geographically-linked regions through the use of food-related imagery in their tourism visitor’s guides. The findings of this study can also offer valuable information to tourism industry stakeholders who have identified culinary tourism as a priority and want to further develop their positioning, differentiation, and marketing strategies using food-related imagery.

Key words: Canadian Maritime provinces; Food-related imagery; Place branding; Visitor’s guides; Visual analysis

Address correspondence to Dr. Susan C. Graham, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Business, University of Prince Edward Island, McDougall Hall, 316, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada C1A 4P3. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it