Journal of Gastronomy 3(3) Abstracts

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Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 163-176
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15410151918027
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Interest Regimes in Fruit Wine Tourism

Donna Sundbo* and Jon Sundbo

*University College Absalon, Roskilde, Denmark
†Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark

This article introduces a new theory that seeks to explain why people become interested in new experience fields. Interest regime theory is based on sociology and is applied here to the case of modern fruit wine in Denmark. To supplement the theory, the analysis presented here also draws on experiential marketing theory. The empirical research investigates how fruit wine festivals and winery visits are used to promote the new field of modern fruit wine and, through this, local tourism. The findings are based on two wine festivals and winery visits in Denmark, which are studied using a multimethod approach. Producers attempt to create interest for fruit wine and increase sales by creating a fruit wine interest regime, particularly via the festivals. The investigation shows that festivals and winery visits can be means for entrepreneurs to create awareness of and market a new product. However, many visitors at the festivals still did not know how to use or where to purchase fruit wine, and many visitors were driven by other motivational patterns, particularly having a pleasant experience, and local visitors were motivated by supporting the local community. So far, the effect on local tourism seems limited.

Key words: Fruit wine; Wine tourism; Wine festivals; Experiential marketing; Interest regime

Address correspondence to Donna Sundbo, Associate Professor, University College AbsalonTrekroner Forskerpark 4, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 177-190
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15410151918036
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Characteristics and Practices of Gastro-Tourists: Application for a 6+ Gastro-Cluster Destination Development Model

Helena A. Williams,* Jingxue (Jessica) Yuan,† and Robert L. Williams, Jr.‡

*Hospitality Administration, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA
†Department of Hospitality and Retail Management, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA
‡Sigmund Weis School of Business, Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, PA, USA

This research focuses on the characteristics and practices of self-identified gastro-tourists—travelers who plan excursions entirely or partially to experience other cultures through intense experiential gastronomic activities. This is the first empirical study that examines differences between ideal and actual gastro-tourist practices that include: number of activities in a given trip, travel distance between activities, spending practices across deliberate or incidental status, and identification with a culture. The study reports that overall travel and spending practices of gastro-tourists across generations (Baby Boomers, GenXers, and Millennials) are more alike than different. The study also identifies attributes and strategies that can be used to match the ideal desires and expectations of both deliberate and incidental gastro-tourists and found that 40% of tourists’ most memorable gastro-experiences began as incidental. The study concludes by proposing a 6+ Gastro-cluster Destination Development Model that decision makers or planners in the tourism and/or hospitality industries could consider as they create or expand local gastro-tourism initiatives.

Key words: Gastro-tourism; Culinary tourism; Destination branding; Food trails; Economic development

Address correspondence to Jingxue (Jessica) Yuan, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Hospitality and Retail Management, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA. Tel: 806-834-8446; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 191-202
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15410151918045
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Experiences of Tourists Suffering From Food Intolerances

Viktoria-Maria Schiefert* and Xavier Matteucci

*Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, FHWien University of Applied Sciences, Vienna, Austria
†Department of Tourism and Service Management, MODUL University Vienna, Vienna, Austria

The number of people who are affected by a food intolerance has risen dramatically over recent years. Although food plays a central role in tourism experiences, little is known about how food-intolerant people experience eating out during their holiday (away from home). To fill this knowledge gap, and following a constructivist grounded theory strategy, nine in-depth interviews with food-intolerant tourists were conducted. The textual data analysis revealed four main themes, which underpin the experiences of tourists with food intolerances: mistrust of food labeling and restaurant personnel, uncertainty, the feeling of being a burden to others, and the perceived lack of empathy in food-intolerant customers. Each one of these four themes are a source of worry and stress to people with food intolerances. Implications for practice are discussed.

Key words: Tourist experience; Food intolerance; Eating out; Constructivist grounded theory

Address correspondence to Viktoria-Maria Schiefert, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, FHWien University of Applied Sciences, Wahringer Gurtel 97, 1180 Vienna, Austria. Tel: 0043 699 17189972; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 203-216
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15410151918054
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Food Tourists’ Travel Behavior and Well-Being Effects

Martin Lohmann and Antonia Femers

Institute of Experimental Industrial Psychology, Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany

This empirical study aims to identify the segment of “food tourists” with a quantitative approach, using data on behavior, motives, and attitudes. It explores food tourists’ holiday trip behavior and the effects of such vacations on indicators of well-being (e.g., recreation, health, and others). The data stem from a quantitative survey in Germany as a representative source market study (“Reiseanalyse 2015”), based on a nationwide random sample of N = 7,720 face-to-face interviews, with n = 5,996 holiday travelers, and n = 1,511 food tourists. Thus, the data analysis is based on a post hoc segmentation with respect to who a food tourist is and who is not. The results allow determining the size of the food tourism segment with German tourists and the description of demographic characteristics as well as specific vacation behavior patterns. In addition, food tourists show notable positive vacation effects, such as recreation, significantly above the average. As a statistical investigation (three-way between-subjects ANOVA) reveals, these impacts of a food holiday are not only driven by the culinary experience but also are strongly based on personal attitudes and motives, showing the importance of in-person factors on the consumption experience of tourists. Implications are outlined for consumer research in tourism and marketing.

Key words: Food tourism; Market segmentation; Psychological effects of holiday tourism; Well-being

Address correspondence to Prof. Dr. Martin Lohmann, Institute of Experimental Industrial Psychology, Leuphana University, LueneburgWilschenbrucher Weg 84A, D- 21335, Lueneburg, Germany. Tel: 0049431 666 567 11; Fax: 0049431 666 567 10; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 217-227
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15410151918063
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Multifarious Capacity of Food Festivals in Rural Areas

Grzegorz Kwiatkowski

Department of Economic Policy and Tourism, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Koszalin University of Technology, Koszalin, Poland
Department of Business Administration, Faculty of Business Administration and Social Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Sogndal, Norway

From traditional harvest celebrations to commercially oriented gatherings, food festivals have proliferated and diversified in rural areas as of late. What are food festivals’ long-term effects on rural areas in contrast to their apparent short-lived natures? This study aims to trace the role of food festivals in rural areas from the festival organizers’ standpoint. Drawing on primary data from 48 food festivals staged in the Danish countryside, this study shows how food festivals, despite being commercial endeavors, contribute to the conservation and development of regional identities by promoting local food assets, bringing people together, and linking local resources with global markets. The results also show that the Danish food festival market is all-embracing and contains festivals that range in attendance from a few hundred up to several thousand visitors coming both from the local area and elsewhere. Additionally, the festivals’ offerings represent a great diversity: some festivals are dedicated to a single product, whereas others convey a wide regional representation of products. In terms of theory development, the current study allows for the clearer conceptualization of the role that food festivals play in place (rural) development and the challenges that festivals organizers face during festivals’ positioning in an area of commercialization.

Key words: Food; Festivals; Commercialization; Authenticity; Rural areas

Address correspondence to Grzegorz Kwiatkowski, Assistant professor, Department of Economic Policy and Tourism, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Koszalin University of Technology, Kwiatkowskiego 6e; 75-343 Koszalin, Poland. Tel/Fax: +48600553096; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it