Tourism Analysis 23(4) Abstracts

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Tourism Analysis, Vol. 23, pp. 445-459
1083-5423/18 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354218X15391984820387
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tourists’ Values and Perceived Appropriate Uses of National Parks

Seyed Ahmad Moumen Ghazvini,* Dallen J. Timothy,†‡ Joao Sarmento,§ and Lay Kian Lim*

*Department of Tourism Management, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah alam, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia
†School of Community Resources and Development, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA
‡School of Tourism and Hospitality, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
§Geography Department & Communication and Society Research Centre, University of Minho, Guimaraes, Portugal

National park managers must consider people’s different values, beliefs, and attitudes in developing management plans and policies to justify providing opportunities for public recreation preserving ecological integrity. This study examines tourists’ perceptions of appropriate uses of, and services within, national parks, which in turn are influenced by their value orientations. It then investigates how value orientations can affect tourists’ perceptions toward appropriate uses of national parks. The article also identifies the mediating role of environmental concern on value orientations with regard to appropriate national park uses and services. Data from 379 tourists in Malaysia’s Taman Negara National Park reveal that tourists perceive appreciative or passive activities as most appropriate and more consumptive activities, such as hunting and golf courses, as least appropriate. Results also indicate positive and negative relationships between value orientations and perceived suitableness of accommodations and services, activities, and facilities within national parks.

Key words: Ecotourism; Value orientations; Ecological attitudes; Environmental concern; Appropriate use; National parks; Malaysia

Address correspondence to Seyed Ahmad Moumen Ghazvini, Department of Tourism Management, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah alam, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 23, pp. 461-473
1083-5423/18 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354218X15391984820396
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Flow Experience in Paragliding: Effects on Experience and Life Satisfaction

Reyhan Arslan Ayazlar* and Atila Yuksel†

*Faculty of Tourism, Department of Tourism Management, Muğla Sıtkı Kocman University, Muğla, Turkey
†Faculty of Tourism, Department of Food & Beverage Management, Adnan Menderes University, Kuşadası, Turkey

Although individuals’ life satisfaction have been studied in a tourism setting, there has been limited research suggesting the flow experience as a predictor of life satisfaction. Studies investigating the antecedents of flow experience in an adventure setting are also scarce. Therefore, this study was aimed to explore the interrelationships among these constructs using a quantitative design. A sample drawn from 296 paragliding participants in Turkey was used. Structural equation modeling approach was utilized to test the research model. The results strongly supported six of seven hypotheses; the sense of control dimension was not supported. Sensation seeking dimension was first time supported as an antecedent of flow experience in paragliding activity. Challenge–skill balance and concentration were also found as strong antecedents of flow state. The direct and indirect relationships through experience satisfaction between flow experience and life satisfaction was also demonstrated in this setting. Results are discussed and recommendations are identified for adventure tourism managers.

Key words: Flow experience; Paragliding; Adventure tourism; Life satisfaction; Sensation seeking

Address correspondence to Reyhan Arslan Ayazlar, Faculty of Tourism, Department of Tourism Management, Muğla Sıtkı Kocman University, Kotekli Campus, 48000 Muğla, Turkey. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 23, pp. 475-488
1083-5423/18 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354218X15391984820404
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

How Political Perceptions Affect Attitudes Toward Tourism: A Study of Chinese Generations

Shangzhi (Charles) Qiu,* Yunzi Zhang,† and Liping Cai‡

*School of Management, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China
†Business Department, Northern Marianas College, Commonwealth of Northern Marianas Islands
‡School of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA

Based on the case of Chinese tourists’ travel to Japan, this study is aimed at providing more insight on the relationship between international politics and travel decisions. This study identifies the generational gaps of attitudinal structure between the Chinese Cohort 60 (CC 60) and Chinese Post-80s (CP 80) based on the textual data collected through in-depth interviews with two generations of Chinese tourists. The fluctuation of Chinese tourist arrivals in Japan following diplomatic incidents suggests that Sino–Japanese historical and contemporary political incidents may have an effect on tourism attitude. Result indicated that the association between the attitudes toward tourism, Japan, and political incidents are stronger for CC 60 than for CP 80. Compared with CP 80, CC 60 tourists hold stronger stereotype and prejudice toward the Japanese, as well as experience considerable pressure from anti-Japanese social norm, thereby producing cognitive dissonance for those interested in visiting Japan. CP 80 hold more neutral attitude toward Japan tourism and their intention to travel to Japan is less influenced by their attitude toward this country and the historical incidents. The findings have implication on sustainable Sino–Japan tourism and pointed out the important role of political incidents in tourist behavior.

Key words: Tourist attitude structure; Generational gap; Japan tourism; Chinese tourists; Political incidents

Address correspondence to Shangzhi (Charles) Qiu, Assistant Professor, School of Management, Xiamen University, 422 S. Siming Road, Xiamen, China. Tel: +8613317885031; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 23, pp. 489-502
1083-5423/18 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354218X15391984820440
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Mobilities in the Asia Pacific Region: Constellations and Diversity

Huong T. Bui,* Hugh C. Wilkins,† and Hiroaki Saito‡

*College of Asia Pacific Studies, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University (APU), Beppu, Japan
†School of Business & Law, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia
‡College of International Management, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University (APU), Beppu, Japan

Adapting mobilities theory in the context of the Asia Pacific region, this study provides empirical evidence that demonstrates the travel–migration relationship is mediated by intercultural adaptation and moderated by the degree of travel freedom. Mobility, however is not equal among the various nationalities in the region. The likelihood of travel–migration conversion is stronger among advanced East Asian economies such as Japan and South Korea, where citizen are entitled to higher degree of freedom to travel. Citizens from Southeast Asia and China, however, are subject to certain level of travel restriction and overseas travel experience is less likely to predict their propensity for migration. Researchers triangulated and integrated findings across different methods to develop and validate measurement scales before testing hypotheses particularized for the context of the current study.

Key words: Youth travel; Migration; Adaptation; Travel freedom; Mobilities

Address correspondence to Huong T. Bui, College of Asia Pacific Studies, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University (APU), 1-1 Jumonjibaru, Beppu, Oita 874-8577, Japan. Tel: +81-977-78-1295; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 23, pp. 503-515
1083-5423/18 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354218X15391984820459
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Media Coverage, Tourism Growth, and Spatial Spillover: Evidence From China

Xiaolong Sun,*† Bishu Lin,* Jie Gao,‡ and Yuxia Lin*

School of Management, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian, China
†School of International Tourism & Culture, Guizhou Normal University, Guiyang, Guizhou, China
‡School of Geography & Tourism, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang, Guizhou, China

This study investigates the direct and spillover effects of media coverage on tourism growth in China. The theoretical foundation for how media affects development of regional tourism economy is deduced. An empirical analysis based on panel data from 31 Chinese provinces for the years 2003–2014 is presented through ordinary and spatial regression model. The main conclusions of the econometric analysis are that media coverage can significantly promote the development of local tourism growth by acting as an information intermediary, enhancing the image of the tourism destination, and forming public opinion pressure. Local media coverage can yield a positive impact on the economic development of neighboring tourism areas, as a result of accelerating the exchange and spillover efficiency of regional tourism information. Comparing to the geographical distance between provinces, the correlations degree of interregional tourism economy is more conducive to promote the spillover effect of media coverage on tourism growth. 

Key words: Media coverage; Tourism economic development; Spatial spillover; China

Address correspondence to Xiaolong Sun, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Administration, School of Management, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005, China. Tel: + 86 18805926753; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 23, pp. 517-531
1083-5423/18 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354218X15391984820495
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Using Drawings to Explore Images of Vienna

Xavier Matteucci and Irem Önder

Department of Tourism and Service Management, MODUL University Vienna, Vienna, Austria

This article illustrates how drawing has been employed as a stand-alone method to research destination image. Despite arguments for unstructured approaches to learn about how people conceive places, few tourism researchers have explored the potential of the drawing technique. We sought to address this methodological gap by collecting visual data that would capture a more holistic image of a destination. Thus, 88 drawings of Vienna, the Austrian capital, were collected among a student population of past visitors and nonvisitors. Content analysis and compositional interpretation were used to identify relevant attributes about Vienna, and to flesh out the destination’s affective dimension. We used a biplot to visually represent the research findings from the two groups. Although exploratory, this study reveals the potential of drawings as a tool to research destination images held by both past visitor and nonvisitor groups.

Key words: Drawing; Destination image; Content analysis; Vienna; Compositional interpretation

Address correspondence to Xavier Matteucci, Research Associate, Department of Tourism and Service Management, MODUL University Vienna, Am Kahlenberg 1, 1190 Vienna, Austria. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 23, pp. 533-551
1083-5423/18 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354218X15391984820503
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Impact of National Institutional Quality on International Tourism Inflows: A Cross-Country Evidence

Young-Rae Kim,* Shrabani Saha,† Ilan Vertinsky,‡ and Chansoo Park§

*Department of Tourism Management & Truman Graduate School of Public Affairs, Mongolia International University, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
†Lincoln Business School, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, UK
‡The Sauder School of Business, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
§Faculty of Business Administration, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. Johns, Canada

This article explores the effects of the overall quality of national governance institutions of a country, along with the quality of some of its key characteristics, on international tourism inflows and the revenues a country derives from them. This article argues that increases in institutional quality reduce transaction costs and risks faced by both suppliers of international tourist services and tourists. We hypothesize that countries with “higher quality” of governance institutions are likely to attract more international tourists and derive more revenues from them. Our hypothesis is tested using panel data drawn from 108 countries between 1996 and 2011. The results strongly support the hypothesis. This study found that regulatory quality and the rule of law are the governance characteristics that have the most impact on international tourism flows. Improvement of institutional quality has more impact on tourism in high income countries than in emerging economies. The results are robust to different estimation methods, different measures of international tourism and institutional quality.

Key words: Institutional quality; International tourism inflows; Panel data

Address correspondence to Young-Rae Kim, Assistant Professor, Department of Tourism Management & Truman Graduate School of Public Affairs, Mongolia International University, 13th Khorooo, Bayanzurkh District, P.O. Box 252, Post Office No. 51, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 23, pp. 553-560
1083-5423/18 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354218X15391984820512
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note

Residents’ Place Image: Place to Live Versus Tourist Destination

Dimitrios Stylidis

Department of Marketing, Branding and Tourism, The Business School, Middlesex University, London, UK

Despite growing attention given to the notion of place, research focusing on the resident perspective is still fragmented, with some studies exploring the image of a place as a place to live in (city image) and others as a tourist destination. Aiming to bridge existing streams of research, this study explores the capacity of established image dimensions to predict residents’ image of their place as a) a place to live in and b) a tourist destination. Data were collected from a sample of 368 residents of Eilat, Israel. Findings suggest that the social environment, natural environment, and accessibility were the most important antecedents of residents’ city image, whereas social environment, amenities, and attractions were the most important determinants of residents’ destination image. The findings advance knowledge on place image conceptualization, offering practical insights for developing a place both as a place to live in and as a tourist destination.

Key words: Place image; City image; Destination image

Address correspondence to Dimitrios Stylidis, Department of Marketing, Branding and Tourism, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT, UK. Tel: +442084114465; E mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 23, pp. 561-565
1083-5423/18 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354218X15391984820530
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note

Chinese Travelers’ Group Decision-Making

Hanqun Song,* Ying Wang,† and Beverley A. Sparks†

*Department of Logistics, Operations, Hospitality and Marketing, Huddersfield Business School, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK
†Department of Tourism, Sport and Hotel Management, Griffith Business School, Griffith University, Southport, Australia

This study investigates Chinese travelers’ group decision-making. Small groups were recruited to participate in a simulated travel decision-making task where each group selected either an international destination or a domestic destination for the group vacation. This study examines travelers’ group decision-making from the content (i.e., topics) and the process (i.e., verbal and nonverbal interaction process) perspectives. Analysis of the content of group discussions reveals 12 key topics. Participants’ verbal behaviors are analyzed following Bales’ Interaction Process Analysis, and nonverbal behaviors are examined based on seven nonverbal displays. This study provides insights into understanding group travel decision-making among Chinese travelers.

Key words: Group decision-making; Travel decision-making; Interaction process analysis; Chinese traveler

Address correspondence to Hanqun Song, Department of Logistics, Operations, Hospitality and Marketing, Huddersfield Business School, University of Huddersfield, Room CS 3/36, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, HD1 3DH, UK. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 23, pp. 567-570
1083-5423/18 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354218X15391984820549
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note

The Influence of Travelers’ Satisfaction With Destination Tertiary Services on Loyalty

Viraiyan Teeroovengadum,* Boopen Seetanah,† and Robin Nunkoo*‡§

*Department of Management, University of Mauritius, Reduit, Mauritius
†Department of Finance and Accounting, University of Mauritius, Reduit, Mauritius
‡School of Tourism and Hospitality, University of Johannesburg, South Africa
§Griffith Institute for Tourism, Griffith University, Australia

This article investigates the influence of travelers’ satisfaction with a destination’s tertiary support services on their loyalty behavior, conceptualized as revisit intention. The study is based on data collected from 1,721 travelers to Mauritius. To have a better understanding of the influence of travelers’ satisfaction with tertiary support services available at the destination on their loyalty behavior, we develop two Probit models. To control for other factors that may affect the decision of tourists to revisit Mauritius as a destination, other potential determinants of revisit intention were also included in the econometric models. Results suggest that travelers’ satisfaction with tertiary support services has a significant influence on their loyalty. In particular, their satisfaction with security services and banking services are the strongest determinant of loyalty.

Key words: Satisfaction; Destination loyalty; Tertiary support services

Address correspondence to Robin Nunkoo, Ph.D., Department of Management, University of Mauritius, Reduit 80837, Mauritius. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 23, pp. 573-586
1083-5423/18 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354218X15391984820558
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Review

Tourism and Soft Power: Scripting Servicescapes for the China Outbound Market

Patricia C. Johnson

Newcastle Business School, University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia

This article critically inspects worldmaking as a concept, lens, and approach to uncover political agendas that stretch beyond tourism. Worldmaking is a process of fabricating peoples and places through art, literature, and other representational forms. Launched in 2012 as a key deliverable of Tourism 2020, the Welcoming Chinese Visitor Program (WCVP) is a Sino-Australian device of soft power that works to Easternize business practice in the Australian tourism industry. Worldmaking assists to see how the text demanufactures bygone beliefs to remanufacture a new China through the discursive framework of patriotism, pride, and emerging world power. The analysis reveals tourism as an agent of soft power and the facilitator to further a political agenda. This postdisciplinary research draws from the psychology of human interaction with Rasmussen, Sieck, Crandall, Simpkins, and Smith’s four domains of competency model and Shank and Abelson’s knowledge structure model. The Service Ready module emphasizes three key themes as necessary inclusions to all servicescape scripts aimed at Chinese visitors: the 3Ps of pride, position, and power. Worldmaking as a platform for enquiry provides an approach that swivels the focus from tourism as subject to tourism as agent.

Key words: Worldmaking; Soft power; Postdisciplinary; Outbound China tourism market; Tourism servicescapes; Australian tourism industry

Address correspondence to Patricia C. Johnson, Newcastle Business School, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it