Journal of Gastronomy 3(1) Abstracts

Return to Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism>

Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 1-16
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15193195617764
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Coastal Gastronomy: Envisioning a South Carolina Seafood Trail

Laura W. Jodice,* Gregory Ramshaw,* Agnes Sirima,† and Lynn Goris‡

*Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA
†Department of Tourism and Recreation, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania
‡University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Promotion of local seafood and related culture has become an important strategy for enhancing economic sustainability of struggling commercial fishing businesses in coastal tourism destinations. Theme-based tourism trails can be catalysts for identifying, recognizing, and sustaining important aspects of culture, heritage, and industry in rural regions. Food-based trails have become a popular strategy for enhancing the economic viability of local food producers while highlighting the authentic qualities of a tourist destination. This study explored potential for development of a seafood-themed trail on the coast of South Carolina (USA) where communities represent varying levels of economic dependence on commercial fishing and tourism. Methods included 31 personal interviews with stakeholders from the seafood and tourism sectors across the region and a follow-up survey (n = 13) and workshop (n = 15) to facilitate input and consensus. Stakeholders supported formation of a coast-wide seafood trail as an education and decision-making tool targeting tourists. They highlighted collaborative capacity for marketing and partnership, diversity of local seafood products and experience, and economic benefits and improved competitive advantage for local businesses as strengths and opportunities. Challenging issues for development and long-term viability included limits to local seafood supply, regional differences in both heritage and seafood products, financial constraints, maintaining interest among stakeholders and visitors, establishing leadership, and defining membership criteria.

Key words: Rural; Tourism; Fisheries; Marketing; Stakeholder; Marine resources

Address correspondence to Laura W. Jodice, Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management, Clemson University, 263 Lehotsky Hall, Box 340735, Clemson, SC, USA. Tel: 864-506-6041; Fax: 864-656-2226; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 17-30
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15193195617782
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Demand for Specialty Food Initiatives: Considerations for Meeting Planning and Destination Management

Susan L. Slocum,* Whitney Knollenberg,† and Carol Kline‡

*Tourism and Event Management, College of Education and Human Development, George Mason University, Prince William Campus, Manassas, VA, USA
†Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA
‡Hospitality and Tourism Management, Walker College of Business, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, USA

Food tourism studies in leisure travel markets are extensive, yet the role food plays in business markets is still under investigated. Specialty foods are recognized as a form of sustainable tourism, yet have not been adequately addressed as an avenue to differentiate destinations for the meeting planning industry. With the growth in sustainable consumption values, travelers are seeking business travel packages that move beyond general “green” destinations and are seeking ethical options that support regional development, the humane treatment of animals, and showcase specialty regional culinary treasures. This article assesses meeting planners’ willingness to pay for specialty foods, including local, humane, and artisan food service menu options. Results show that there are wide varieties of sustainable food-based meeting initiatives that appeal to meeting planners and provide new marketing options that can differentiate meeting destinations. However, this study also shows that the core aspects of meetings, specifically general venue attributes and diet-specific food offerings, are specific requirements that must be met before a sustainability option will be considered.

Key words: Meeting planners; Specialty foods; Willingness to pay; Destination management; Sustainable venues; Meetings, incentives, conferences, and events (MICE)

Address correspondence to Carol Kline, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Hospitality and Tourism Management, Walker College of Business, Appalachian State University, 4078 Peacock Hall, Boone, NC 28608, USA. Tel: (001) 919-306-1705; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 31-42
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15193195617791
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Gastronomy Metaphors According to Restaurant Employees

Gökhan Yilmaz,* Mustafa Ülker,† and Selami Gültekin*

*Akdeniz University Tourism Faculty, Antalya, Turkey
Erciyes University Tourism Faculty, Kayseri, Turkey

The aim of this study is to reveal hotel restaurant employees’ perceptions of the term “gastronomy” through metaphors. In 2015, a survey was applied to 101 employees (executive chefs, food and beverage managers, waiting staff, etc.) working at 14 different hotels located in the Cappadocia province of Turkey. Blank forms were distributed to employees to reveal their perceptions, thoughts, and views about “gastronomy,” and participants were asked to write a text about the term. Document analysis was used as a means of data collection; descriptive and content analyses were used for data analysis. Employees developed 76 metaphors regarding the term “gastronomy” and these metaphors were grouped under seven dimensions: the production dimension of gastronomy; consumption dimension of gastronomy; science dimension of gastronomy; art dimension of gastronomy; health dimension of gastronomy; culture dimension of gastronomy; and occupation dimension of gastronomy. A main conclusion is that staff was most likely to address issues close to the operational world of the kitchen, including not the least food safety issues. Metaphors about the customers’ experience were nonfrequent, which suggests that staff members work without much physical and cognitive contact with customers. The study discusses the potential strategic and managerial implications.

Key words: Gastronomy; Gastronomy metaphors; Restaurant employees; Employee perceptions

Address correspondence to Gökhan Yilmaz, Research Assistant, Akdeniz University Tourism Faculty, Antalya, Turkey. Tel: + 90 242 310 66 54; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 43-54
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15193195617809
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

British Picnics Come of Age: Food and Fashionability in the 1930s

Phil Lyon

Department of Food and Nutrition, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden

Picnics are an ephemeral feature of social life and suggest a meal that is different in form, eaten in unfamiliar surroundings, and often representing an escape from routine. Although picnics might be regarded as a longstanding tradition in Britain, they were popularized in the 1930s as an adjunct to substantial changes in leisure patterns, and by the opportunities provided by private and public transport. Newspapers reflected this popularity in their coverage. Using digital archive material, primarily for The Times and the Manchester Guardian, period newspaper reports were analyzed in terms of popularity, advice on what to eat, the consumer market for equipment, and rural impact. Picnics, goods, and services connected with them, and the negative environmental consequences of picnicking were regular features of media discourse during the period 1930–1939: this coverage represent a window into the perhaps surprising fashionability of what is now a tacit feature of food culture.

Key words: Food; Picnics; 1930s; Consumer market; Newspapers; Leisure; Day tourism

Address correspondence to Phyl Lyon, Department of Food and Nutrition Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden. Tel: +46 90 786 50 00; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 55-65
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15193195617818
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Gourmet Travel: Culinary Television Representations of Food-Inspired Touring

Bernardine Lynch

Learning & Teaching Centre, Australian Catholic University, East Melbourne, Australia

This article examines one of the earliest forms of culinary television, the food/travel program. The vicarious travel opportunities such programs offer are explored to reveal the lifestyle aspirations of contemporary audiences. Food is an essential part of any culture and often relatively accessible, and therefore an easy way to experience other places and lives, however vicariously. In the close study of two contemporary Australian television programs, Food Safari and Luke Nguyen’s Vietnam, this article examines media representations of cultures and cuisines, and constructions of otherness. The pivotal role the hosts of current food television play in the promotion of consumption is also explored. It finds that in combining the pleasures of food and travel, culinary programs provide a risk-free way of exploring foreignness, both locally and globally. Ideas of authenticity are key to these explorations. However, culinary television depictions of cultures and cuisines are complex and, at times, problematic in encouraging understanding primarily through consumption.

Key words: Food; Television; Travel; Representation; Consumption

Address correspondence to Dr. Bernardine Lynch, Learning & Teaching Centre, Australian Catholic University, Room 460.5.10A, Level 5, 250 Victoria Parade, East Melbourne VIC 3002, Australia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 3, pp. 67-80
2169-2971/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929718X
15193195617827
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tourists’ Foraging for Oysters: A Governance Innovation Perspective

Anne-Mette Hjalager,* Per Dolmer,† and Lulu Anna Hansen‡

*Department of Entrepreneurship and Relationship Management, University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark
†Head of Marine Section, Orbicon A/S, Viby J, Denmark
‡Head of History Department, Southwest Jutland Museums, Ribe, Denmark

Foraging for oysters in the protected Danish Wadden Sea National Park is an increasingly popular tourism experience. The abundance of the Pacific oyster is high and rising. As it is an invasive species, visitors’ oyster picking is not only attractive for culinary reasons, but will also—when organized adequately—benefit nature, particularly in terms of living conditions for migrating birds. Creating a symbiosis between touristic and environmental objectives requires coordinated governance systems. This study demonstrates that, seen from the point of tourism, there are significant incompatibilities in the rules, regulations, and institutional set-ups that govern nature protection, food safety, and access to recreational foraging and commercial fisheries. Governance innovations are essential to ensure an environmentally sustainable use of the oyster resource and, simultaneously, a positive touristic development and a commercial oyster fishery in the local communities. Three interacting trajectories of interventions and policies are outlined: the tour guide-dominated trajectory, a coastal fisheries cluster trajectory, and the visitor empowerment trajectory. It is concluded that the traditional tourism sector cannot dissolve the paradoxes, but needs dedicated power contributions from a wider range of governance institutions and local actors.

Key words: Recreational foraging; Oysters; Governance innovations; Tour guides; Wadden Sea Denmark

Address correspondence to Anne-Mette Hjalager, Professor, Department of Entrepreneurship and Relationship Management, University of Southern Denmark, Universitetsparken 1, DK-6000 Kolding, Denmark. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it